Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – HLHS

The “Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome” – or more conveniently, “HLHS” – is a unique defect of the heart in many ways. Until a decade ago, the diagnosis was a virtual death sentence. Today, the revolution in cardiac surgical thinking and technique has changed the situation radically.

Whereas survival beyond the first few months of life was previously unheard of, many centers are today reporting encouraging results. And it is bound to improve further as more knowledge is gained from the early experience.

What is the HLHS ?

The heart has two upper and two lower chambers – one of each is right sided and the other left sided. The left sided chambers, with their blood vessels and valves are sometimes referred to as the LEFT HEART. ( This does not mean that the person has TWO hearts! )

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Coarctation of the Aorta – CoA

You have read something of congenital heart defects inside the heart. Now let us consider a defect that is outside the heart itself, in one of the great arteries of the body – the aorta.

What is COARCTATION of the aorta ?

Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is an area of localized narrowing of the large artery called the aorta. (“Coarctatio” – Latin : a drawing or pressing together). The narrowing may be caused by a “shelf” of tissue inside the blood vessel which reduces its area. Alternately, it may be caused by under-development of a portion of the aorta itself, which causes a longer area of reduced diameter.

Where does CoA occur ?

The narrowing that occurs in CoA is most commonly seen at a portion called the ISTHMUS.

But what is the isthmus ?

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